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The New Rules of Lifting for Life: A Proven Plan to Build Muscle, Lose Fat, and Improve Your Health and Performance at Any Age


The New Rules of Lifting for Life: An All-New Muscle-Building, Fat-Blasting Plan for Men and Women




Introduction




Lifting weights is not just for young athletes or bodybuilders. It is a vital activity that can benefit anyone at any age, especially as you get older. Whether you want to stay fit, healthy, strong, functional, or simply look good in your clothes, lifting weights can help you achieve your goals.




The new rules of lifting for life : an all-new muscle-building, fat-blasting plan for men and women



But how do you lift weights effectively and safely for life? How do you avoid injuries, boredom, plateaus, or burnout? How do you adapt your lifting routine to your changing needs and preferences over time?


That's where the new rules of lifting for life come in. In this article, you will learn what the new rules of lifting for life are, why you need a lifting plan for life, and how to get started with the new rules of lifting for life. You will also discover the benefits of lifting for life, the principles of lifting for life, and the program of lifting for life.


By the end of this article, you will have a clear understanding of how to lift weights for life and enjoy the process. So let's get started!


The Benefits of Lifting for Life




Lifting weights is one of the best things you can do for your physical and mental well-being. Here are some of the benefits of lifting for life:


Lifting for life improves your health and longevity




Lifting weights can help you prevent or manage various chronic diseases and conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease, osteoporosis, arthritis, back pain, and more. Lifting weights can also boost your immune system, lower your blood pressure and cholesterol levels, improve your blood sugar control, and reduce inflammation.


Lifting weights can also help you live longer. According to a study published in the British Medical Journal, people who did strength training at least twice a week had a 23% lower risk of death from any cause and a 31% lower risk of death from cancer than those who did not.


Lifting for life boosts your metabolism and fat loss




Lifting weights can help you burn more calories during and after your workout. This is because lifting weights increases your muscle mass, which is more metabolically active than fat. Muscle tissue requires more energy to maintain than fat tissue, so the more muscle you have, the higher your resting metabolic rate (RMR) will be.


Lifting weights can also help you lose fat and maintain a healthy body composition. This is because lifting weights stimulates the production of hormones that promote fat burning, such as growth hormone (GH) and testosterone. Lifting weights can also improve your insulin sensitivity, which means your body can use glucose more efficiently and store less of it as fat.


Lifting for life enhances your strength and functionality




Lifting weights can help you improve your strength and power, which are essential for performing daily activities and preventing falls and injuries. Lifting weights can also improve your balance, coordination, mobility, and flexibility, which are important for maintaining your independence and quality of life.


Lifting weights can also help you improve your performance in sports and hobbies that you enjoy, such as golf, tennis, hiking, gardening, or dancing. Lifting weights can also help you prevent or recover from sports-related injuries, such as sprains, strains, or tears.


Lifting for life increases your confidence and happiness




Lifting weights can help you improve your self-esteem and body image, which are linked to your mental health and happiness. Lifting weights can help you feel more confident in your abilities and appearance, which can positively affect your relationships, career, and social life.


Lifting weights can also help you reduce stress and anxiety, which are common causes of depression and mood disorders. Lifting weights can help you release endorphins, which are natural painkillers and mood enhancers. Lifting weights can also help you cope with negative emotions, such as anger, frustration, or sadness.


The Principles of Lifting for Life




Now that you know the benefits of lifting for life, let's look at the principles of lifting for life. These are the guidelines that will help you lift weights effectively and safely for life. Here are the four main principles of lifting for life:


Lift with proper form and technique




The first and most important principle of lifting for life is to lift with proper form and technique. This means that you should perform each exercise correctly, with full range of motion, controlled speed, and appropriate alignment. This will help you maximize the benefits of each exercise, minimize the risk of injury, and prevent bad habits from forming.


To lift with proper form and technique, you should learn from a qualified trainer or coach who can teach you the basics of each exercise and correct any errors. You should also use a mirror or a video camera to check your form and technique regularly. You should also listen to your body and stop if you feel any pain or discomfort.


Lift with progressive overload and variation




The second principle of lifting for life is to lift with progressive overload and variation. This means that you should gradually increase the difficulty of your workouts over time, by changing one or more variables, such as weight, reps, sets, rest time, tempo, or exercise selection. This will help you challenge your muscles, stimulate growth and adaptation, and avoid plateaus.


To lift with progressive overload and variation, you should follow a structured program that has a clear progression scheme and a variety of exercises. You should also track your workouts and record your progress. You should also experiment with different methods of overload and variation, such as supersets, drop sets, circuits, pyramids, or complexes.


Lift with recovery and nutrition in mind




The third principle of lifting for life is to lift with recovery and nutrition in mind. This means that you should give your body enough time and resources to recover from your workouts and grow stronger. This will help you prevent overtraining, injury, illness, and burnout.


To lift with recovery and nutrition in mind, you should follow a sensible schedule that allows for adequate rest between workouts. You should also get enough sleep every night (7-9 hours), drink enough water every day (2-3 liters), eat enough calories every day (based on your goals), eat enough protein every day (1-2 grams per kilogram of body weight), eat enough carbs every day (based on your activity level), eat enough healthy fats every day (20-30% of your calories), eat enough fruits and vegetables every day (5-10 servings), eat enough fiber every day (25-35 grams), eat mostly whole foods (minimize processed foods), eat mostly nutrient-dense foods (maximize vitamins and minerals), eat mostly anti-inflammatory foods (minimize sugar and alcohol), eat mostly balanced meals (combine protein, carbs, fats), eat mostly according to your hunger cues (avoid overeating or undereating), eat mostly according to your preferences (enjoy your food).


Lift with fun and enjoyment




The fourth principle of lifting for life is to lift with fun and enjoyment. This means that you should make your workouts enjoyable and rewarding for yourself. This will help you stay motivated, consistent, and happy.


The Program of Lifting for Life




Now that you know the principles of lifting for life, let's look at the program of lifting for life. This is a sample program that you can follow or modify to suit your needs and preferences. The program is based on the book "The New Rules of Lifting for Life" by Lou Schuler and Alwyn Cosgrove, which you can check out for more details and variations.


The program consists of three phases, each lasting four to six weeks. Each phase has a different focus and goal, but they all follow the same basic structure. The structure is as follows:


The basic structure of the program




The program is designed to be done three times a week, on non-consecutive days (for example, Monday, Wednesday, Friday). Each workout consists of four parts: warm-up, strength, core, and cardio. Here is a brief description of each part:



  • Warm-up: This part prepares your body and mind for the workout. It includes some dynamic stretches, mobility drills, activation exercises, and light cardio. It should take about 10 minutes.



  • Strength: This part builds your muscle and strength. It includes two or three pairs of exercises that target different muscle groups. You will do each pair as a superset, meaning that you will alternate between the two exercises without resting in between. You will rest for 60-90 seconds after each superset. You will do three to four sets of each superset, with 8-15 reps per set (depending on the phase and exercise). It should take about 20-30 minutes.



  • Core: This part strengthens your core muscles, which include your abs, obliques, lower back, and hips. It includes one or two exercises that challenge your core stability and endurance. You will do each exercise for 30-60 seconds, with 15-30 seconds of rest in between. You will do two to three sets of each exercise. It should take about 10 minutes.



  • Cardio: This part improves your cardiovascular fitness and burns calories. It includes one or two intervals or circuits that involve high-intensity exercises. You will do each exercise for 20-60 seconds, with 10-30 seconds of rest in between. You will repeat each interval or circuit for 10-20 minutes. It should take about 10-20 minutes.



The total duration of each workout should be about 50-80 minutes.


The sample workouts of the program




Here are some sample workouts for each phase of the program. You can use these workouts as they are or modify them according to your equipment, level, or preference. You can also change the order of the exercises or the workouts as long as you follow the basic structure and principles.


Phase 1: Foundation




The goal of this phase is to establish a solid foundation of strength and technique. You will use moderate weights and reps, and focus on learning the proper form and execution of each exercise.


Workout A: Upper Body Push and Pull



PartExerciseSetsReps


Warm-upArm circles110 per direction


Shoulder rotations110 per direction


Chest opener110 per side


Band pull-apart115


Jogging or skipping15 minutes


StrengthDumbbell bench press / Dumbbell row3-410-12 per side


Incline dumbbell fly / Band face pull3-412-15 per side


Dumbbell overhead press / Dumbbell reverse fly3-410-12 per side


CorePlank2-330-60 seconds


Side plank2-315-30 seconds per side


CardioBurpees / Mountain climbers5-1020 seconds / 10 seconds rest


Workout B: Lower Body Squat and Hip Hinge



PartExerciseSetsReps


Warm-upAnkle circles110 per direction per side


Knee rotations110 per direction per side


Hip rotations110 per direction per side


10 per side


Biking or rowing15 minutes


StrengthGoblet squat / Romanian deadlift3-410-12 per side


Bulgarian split squat / Glute bridge3-412-15 per side


Dumbbell step-up / Kettlebell swing3-410-12 per side


CoreBird dog2-315-30 seconds per side


Dead bug2-315-30 seconds per side


CardioSquat jumps / Skater hops5-1020 seconds / 10 seconds rest


Workout C: Full Body Circuit



PartExerciseSetsReps


Warm-upNeck rolls<


1<


10 per direction per side


<


<


Spinal twists


1


10 per direction


Cat-cow stretch


1


10


Inchworms


1


10


Jumping jacks or high knees


1


5 minutes


Strength and Cardio Circuit: Do each exercise for 30 seconds, with 15 seconds of rest in between. Repeat the circuit 3-5 times, with 60 seconds of rest between circuits.


  • Dumbbell squat to press



  • Dumbbell renegade row



  • Dumbbell lunge to curl



  • Dumbbell chest press to fly



  • Dumbbell lateral raise to front raise



  • Dumbbell hammer curl to triceps extension



  • Dumbbell reverse lunge to knee drive



  • Dumbbell pullover to crunch



  • Dumbbell wood chop to squat thrust



  • Dumbbell Russian twist to leg raise




Phase 2: Progression




The goal of this phase is to increase the intensity and complexity of your workouts. You will use heavier weights and lower reps, and add some advanced exercises and techniques.


Workout A: Upper Body Push and Pull with Eccentric Emphasis



PartExerciseSetsReps


td>Warm-upArm circles110 per direction


Shoulder rotations110 per direction


Chest opener110 per side


Band pull-apart115


Jogging or skipping15 minutes


StrengthDumbbell bench press with 3-second eccentric / Dumbbell row with 3-second eccentric<


3-4


6-8 per side


Incline dumbbell fly with 3-second eccentric / Band face pull with 3-second eccentric


3-4


8-10 per side


Dumbbell overhead press with 3-second eccentric / Dumbbell reverse fly with 3-second eccentric


3-4


6-8 per side


Core


Plank with shoulder tap


2-3


30-60 seconds


Side plank with hip dip


2-3


15-30 seconds per side <



Note: Eccentric means lowering the weight slowly and under control. For example, in the dumbbell bench press, you would lower the dumbbells to your chest in three seconds, then press them up quickly.


Workout B: Lower Body Squat and Hip Hinge with Unilateral Emphasis



PartExerciseSetsReps


td>110 per direction per side


Knee rotations110 per direction per side


Hip rotations110 per direction per side


Lunges with twist1<


10 per side


Biking or rowing


1


5 minutes


Strength


Goblet squat with 3-second pause at the bottom / Single-leg Romanian deadlift


3-4


6-8 per side


Bulgarian split squat with 3-second pause at the bottom / Single-leg glute bridge with 3-second pause at the top


3-4


8-10 per side <



Note: Unilateral means working one side at a time. For example, in the single-leg Romanian deadlift, you would balance on one leg and hinge at the hips, lowering the weight to the floor and raising the other leg behind you.


Workout C: Full Body Circuit with Complex Emphasis



PartExerciseSetsReps


td>110 per direction per side


Spinal twists110 per direction


Cat-cow stretch110


Inchworms1<


10


Jumping jacks or high knees


1


5 minutes


Strength and Cardio


Circuit: Do each exercise for 30 seconds, with 15 seconds of rest in between. Repeat the circuit 3-5 times, with 60 seconds of rest between circuits.


  • Dumbbell complex: Squat to press / Row / Lunge to curl / Chest press to fly / Lateral raise to front raise / Hammer curl to triceps extension / Reverse lunge to knee drive / Pullover to crunch / Wood chop to squat thrust / Russian twist to leg raise



  • Kettlebell complex: Swing / Clean / Press / Snatch / Squat / Lunge / Row / Deadlift / High pull / Windmill



  • Bodyweight complex: Burpee / Push-up / Mountain climber / Squat jump / Skater hop / Lunge jump / Plank jack / Bicycle crunch / Spiderman push-up / Star jump




Note: Complex means doing multiple exercises in a row without resting or changing the weight. For example, in the dumbbell complex, you would hold the same pair of dumbbells for all 10 exercises.


Phase 3: Transformation




The goal of this phase is to maximize your results and challenge yourself. You will use lighter weights and higher reps, and add some explosive exercises and techniques.


Workout A: Upper Body Push and Pull with Plyometric Emphasis



PartExerciseSetsReps


td>110 per direction


Shoulder rotations110 per direction


Chest opener1<


10 per side


Band pull-apart


1


15


Jogging or skipping


1


5 minutes


Strength


Dumbbell bench press with plyometric push-up / Dumbbell row with plyometric row


3-4 <



Note: Plyometric means using explosive movements that involve jumping or throwing. For example, in the plyometric push-up, you would push yourself off the floor and clap your hands in mid-air.


Workout B: Lower Body Squat and Hip Hinge with Isometric Emphasis



PartExerciseSetsReps


td>110 per direction per side


Knee rotations110 per direction per side


Hip rotations1<


10 per direction per side


Lunges with twist


1


10 per side


Biking or rowing


1


5 minutes


Strength


Goblet squat with 10-second isometric hold at the bottom / Single-leg Romanian deadlift with 10-second isometric hold at the bottom <



Note: Isometric means holding a posi


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